Courses by Subject

ACCOUNTING

ACCT 1073 COLLEGE ACCOUNTING 
This is an introductory level course focusing on the concepts of accounting. Students will cover the simple accounting functions that they will need to know for their future accounting classes. This foundation will allow them to understand the complex language and insight associated with Accounting. Next courses in sequence: ACCT 2173-Financial Accounting, ACCT 2183-Managerial Accounting (Spring)

ACCT 2173 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING 
Prerequisite: MATH 1303 General Quantitative Reasoning 
This course covers the basic principles of financial accounting processes and accrual accounting concepts. Content includes journalizing, adjustments, inventories, depreciation, current and long term assets and liabilities and owner’s equity including stocks.  (Spring, Fall)

ACCT 2183 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING 
Prerequisite: ACCT 2173 Financial Accounting 
This course covers basic concepts, objectives and interpretations of accounting information needed by firm managers for planning, controlling and decision making. Cost concepts and systems, budgeting, segment reporting methods, performance measures, use of cost data in decision making and financial statement analysis are emphasized.  (Spring, Fall)

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AGRICULTURE

AGRI 1101 AGRICULTURE ORIENTATION 
This course gives students information about campus services and activities, possible career options in agriculture and lays a foundation of skills to be successful in college.  (Fall)

AGRI 2001-3 AGRICULTURE SEMINAR
This course is a study of selected topics in agriculture. 

AGRI 2103 COMMUNICATION IN AGRICULTURE 
Prerequisite:  ENGL 1113 English Composition I
This course focuses on the fundamentals of agriculture news writing and other communication methods.  The students will be informed of careers in agricultural communications and the importance of the media in agriculture and related fields.  (Fall)

AGRI 2113 COMPUTERS IN AGRICULTURE
This course surveys the concepts and principles of computer technology to be used in agriculture. Hands-on experience in the use of spreadsheet, word processing, database, recordkeeping, and presentation software, as well as how to research agricultural problems on the Internet will be emphasized.  (Spring, Fall)

AGRI 2143 INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE EDUCATION
This course is an exploration into the world of teaching agricultural education with a primary focus on the agricultural education programs. Required components will enable students to explore their roles as educators by including hands on experience with SAE projects (Supervised Agricultural Experiences), classroom observations, pedagogical methods, leadership and building community relationships.  (Fall)

AGRI 2193 AGRICULTURE INTERNSHIP
This course is designed to enhance students’ classroom experience in agricultural related areas. The internship will provide the students opportunities to gain further insight into the multi-faceted agriculture industry.  (Spring, Fall)

AGRI 2223 EXPLORATIONS IN AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH
This course is designed as a research foundations experience which will offer students the opportunity to be involved in introductory agricultural research experiences. Explorations in agricultural research will enable students to see the relevance of course work in a “real life” learning laboratory. This course will encourage students to use the skills learned in the introductory animal science, agriculture computers, and anatomy and physiology classes in the exploration of agricultural research.  (Spring)

AGRI 2301 SERVICE LEARNING IN AGRICULTURE
This course integrates community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities.  This course involves students in community service activities to enhance their academic and personal development.  (Spring, Fall)

AGRI 2302 LIVESTOCK PHOTOGRAPHY IN AGRICULTURE
This course provides an opportunity for the student to learn how to set up livestock for photos, catalog and sale design, landscape agriculture, getting to know the camera, settings on camera, rules of photography, photo contest entries, exposure, balance and attractiveness of photos. Bracketing, High Density Resolutions and artsy photography will also be learned. The student will get information on how to manage and adjust photos on a computer using Picassa, Photoshop and Photomatix.  (Spring)

AGRI 2303 AGRICULTURE LEADERSHIP
The course will enable students to explore their roles as leaders in a changing agriculture industry. The emphasis will be on enabling students to explore their personal values system as it applies to leadership. Specific topics include: vision, values, balance, self-awareness and the leadership context.  (Spring)

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AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

AGEC 1373 INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE ECONOMICS 
This course presents basic economic theory of production, marketing and consumption of agricultural products and the role and structure of agriculture in the American economy.  (Spring, Fall)

AGEC 2113 FARM AND RANCH MANAGEMENT 
This course covers the application of principles and practices of farm and ranch management in order to improve or enhance the profitability of the enterprise. (Spring)

AGEC 2143 PRINCIPLES OF AGRICULTURE MARKETING 
This course covers the types of marketing practices and alternatives to these marketing practices. Emphasis will be on the application of principles of marketing for consideration when marketing agriculture products and how to identify markets and market strengths and weaknesses in order to enhance the selling price of those products.  (Spring)

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AGRICULTURE SUSTAINABILITY

AGSU 1012 INTRODUCTION TO AGROECOLOGY AND SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES
This course provides an introduction to the principles, history, and practices associated with sustainability and agroecology. Students will be exposed to topics including sustainable agriculture principles and outlook, soil fertility, tillage/no-till, composting, cover crops, crop rotation, and vermiculture/composting. (Fall)

AGSU 1024 AQUAPONICS
This course covers aquaculture and hydroponics as they combine to form an aquaponics approach, including sustainable aquatics feed production, seeding approaches, micronutrient supplementation, stocking density, plant selection, and the basic physical and biological principles governing sustainable farm and agribusiness operations.  System types presented include Deep Water Culture, Media-based Beds, Nutrient Film Technology and Vertical.  Greenhouse-based, warehouse (LED light), and outdoor applications will be addressed.  (Spring)

AGSU 1034 ALTERNATIVE SUSTAINABLE ENTERPRISES
This course provides a more in-depth examination of sustainable practices/enterprises including vermiculture, composting, recycling, vertical gardening, container gardening, edible landscapes, square foot/raised bed methodologies, water reclamation, and alternative energy sources.  3 hours lecture credit, 1 hour lab credit. (Spring)

AGSU 2012 EDIBLE LANDSCAPE
This course prepares students to design, install, maintain, and harvest intentional food crops and ornamental plants with a nutritional value which have been integrated into a landscape design.  Identification of edibles, planting, pruning, and propagation will be addressed. (Spring)

AGSU 2022 VERMICULTURE TECHNOLOGY
This course prepares students to engage in both vermiculture and vermicomposting.  Topics of study and application include the selection, care, breeding, and harvesting of worms, as well as advantages/disadvantages of multiple vermicompost methods.  In addition, students will be prepared to use both worms and vermicompost in traditional and alternative agricultural applications. (Spring)

AGSU 2032 APICULTURE
This course prepares students in the basics of keeping honey bees, including bee biology, care of bees throughout the year, and management of colonies for maximum bee health and honey production and collection. (Summer)

AGSU 2042 CONTAINER GARDENING
This course prepares students to design and manage gardening / food production system limited space or urban areas.  Plant selection (herbs, flowers, vegetables), water and fertilization needs, and container selection will be included, as well as other limited space growing options such as raised beds and square-foot options. (Fall)

AGSU 2043 GREENHOUSE MANAGEMENT
This course covers greenhouse facilities planning and equipment selection and operation, along with economic / business applications associated with greenhouse operations.  Topics include types of greenhouses, location factors, materials, glazing selection, calculation of and provision of heating and cooling requirements, lighting, benches, and energy conservation. (Fall)

AGSU 2222 APPLIED SUSTAINABILITY CAPSTONE
This course provides an opportunity to explore areas of applied sustainability through the development of a research or advanced learning project culminating in a written report and capstone presentation. (Spring)

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AGRONOMY

AGRN 1124 INTRODUCTION TO SOIL SCIENCE
This course explores the principal physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil related to plant growth.  Students will be instructed on the methods of soil testing and fertilizer usage.  This course also explores the formation and classification of soils and rural and urban land use. 3 hours lecture credit, 1 hour lab credit.  (Spring)
AGRN 1214 INTRODUCTION TO PLANT SCIENCE 
This course covers the concepts and principles of plant growth including crop land, rangeland, and pasture land.  It explores the importance of plant resources to the producer, modern management and production practices, and maintenance of natural resources. 3 hours lecture credit; 1 hour lab credit.  (Fall)
AGRN 2333 RANGE AND PASTURE MANAGEMENT
This course covers the application of range and pasture management principles to maintain plant and animal growth. Emphasis will be on identification of major range and pasture plants, determination of stocking rates, and identification of means and practices for maintaining and enhancing plant growth in an economical and cost effective manner.  (Fall)

ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCE

AHS 1123 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 
This course presents a study of basic medical terminology. Prefixes, suffixes, word roots, combining forms, special endings, plural forms, abbreviations and symbols are included in the content. Programmed learning resources, individual and group presentations, seminars and independent study are utilized to build study skills in constructing/analyzing new terms. Emphasis is placed on spelling, definition, usage, and pronunciation. Abbreviations are also introduced as related terms are presented.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

AHS 2001-4 TOPICS IN ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCE  
This course provides selected learning opportunities in specific areas of health sciences.

AHS 2013 NUTRITION
This course examines the basic composition of nutrients and accessory factors required for adequate human nutrition. It includes the application of nutritional principles to the planning of normal and special dietary regime.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

AHS 2113 PHARMACOLOGY 
This course is an in-depth study of pharmacologic principles, including pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, specific drug groups and considerations in administration. Trends and issues in pharmacologic perspectives also are discussed. The course will benefit those going into health careers such as EMT, nursing, medicine and pharmacy.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

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ANIMAL SCIENCE

ANSI 1124 INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL SCIENCE 
This course examines the various areas and types of production in animal agriculture.  It provides an introduction to nutrition, genetics, reproduction, breeds within species, and an overview of the current status of animal agriculture in the United States. 3 hours lecture credit; 1 hour lab credit.  (Spring, Fall)

ANSI 1213 LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION 
This course covers the application of the basic principles of livestock production. Emphasis will be on livestock breeds, characteristics and selection, balancing rations, and feeding recommendations.  (Spring)

ANSI 2001-3 ANIMAL SCIENCE SEMINAR 
This course is a study of selected topics in Animal Science.

ANSI 2112 LIVESTOCK EVALUATION AND SELECTION 
This course covers the use of performance records, pedigree information and visual appraisal in the evaluation of cattle, swine, and sheep. Students have the opportunity to judge livestock classes and give oral reasons.  (Spring, Fall)

ANSI 2123 LIVESTOCK FEEDING 
This course covers the principles of animal nutrition with emphasis on nutrients and their functions for various classes of livestock feeding.  Students are taught how to formulate rations for domestic livestock and to use the results of the rations to improve rate of gain and control production costs.  (Spring)

ANSI 2142 ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION 
This course is a study and practice of artificial insemination of beef cattle including heat detection, semen care and storage, semen deposition, synchronization, sanitation, and sire selection.  (Spring)

ANSI 2143 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION
This course provides the opportunity to examine the reproductive systems of livestock as such systems produce new offspring. Emphasis will be on identifying the heat cycle, collecting and storing semen and semen deposition, applying the methods of synchronization to alter the heat cycle and demonstrating proficiency with cattle artificial insemination.  (Spring, Fall)

ANSI 2163 BEEF PRODUCTION
This course provides an introduction to the beef cattle industry. Students will study topics including cattle reproduction, anatomy and physiology, management, marketing, and pasture management. Upon completion students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of beef cattle production practices and the economic impact of the beef cattle industry in Oklahoma.  (Fall)

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ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 2013 ANTHROPOLOGY 
This course is an introduction to the study of the origin and development of human culture. Particular topics include race, society, customs, and beliefs.

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ART

ART 1013 BASIC ART I: 2D DESIGN 
This is an introductory course in the two dimensional use of the principles and elements of art and design. Emphasis is placed on the organizational command of the 2D picture plane and issues of illusion. Format of this class will be a combination of studio practice, lecture, demonstration, critique, and quizzes. Students will explore a variety of art mediums including: Drawing, Painting, Mixed Media, and Printmaking. In class exercises, process work, research, and written reflections challenge students to explore the basics of two-dimensional design. Throughout the course, students will collect works to create a portfolio to be evaluated at the end of the semester.  (Spring, Fall)

ART 1023 BASIC ART II: 3D DESIGN 
Prerequisite: ART 1013 Basic Art I: 2D Design
This is an introductory course in the Three Dimensional use of the principles and elements of art and design. Students will work using both the additive and subtractive process, exploring media through representational, abstract and expressive works.  Technique as well as composition will be explored through the use of both the elements and principals working in three dimensions.  Color theory will be explored and discussed in depth as well as the historical context of these methods. Studio experiences, research, and written reflections will challenge students to explore these processes. Throughout the course, students will collect works to create a portfolio to be evaluated at the end of each semester.  (Spring, Fall)

ART 1073 COLOR AND DESIGN 
This course is a study of color theories, perceptions, and the practical application of color principles to a variety of design problems. Students will learn color mixing and color application through a series of projects using color harmonies and visual/psychological color effects. Students will explore the uses of color while using the principles of design in the creation of original works of art. Throughout the course, students will collect works to create a portfolio to be evaluated at the end of each semester.  (Spring)

ART 1113 ART APPRECIATION I 
This course is a study of art from a variety of different backgrounds and cultures as both product and process. Aesthetic judgment making in evaluation of art from different times and places is stressed. The course will cover arts, artists and their cultures, from the Prehistoric man through the Early Renaissance.  (Spring, Fall)

ART 1123 ART APPRECIATION II
This course is a study of the arts, artists and their cultures from the Early Renaissance to the present.  (Spring, Fall)

ART 2001-3 ART SEMINAR 
This course is a study of selected topics in art.

ART 2063 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY
Digital photography has changed the way photographers, both beginners and professionals, think. This class will give the student basics on what type of camera, computer, and software they may want or need to achieve the digital darkroom. They will learn how to capture an image and what to do with that image. Time will be spent on how to move the image from the camera to the computer, along with making corrections for exposure and color. One of the most convenient things about digital photography is how easy it is to share your photos with others. The class will cover printing, e-mailing, and how to prepare your photo to use on a website.  (Spring, Fall)

ART 2093 PAINTING I 
This course is an introduction to the materials and technical aspects of painting with oil or acrylic media. Students will work from direct observation and reference material, exploring use of media through representational and expressive paintings. The process of painting, as well as composition (balance, unity, emphasis, and manipulation of space) will be explored through the use of color, value, line, texture, opacity, and shape. Students will learn color mixing and glazing techniques, and experiment with various brushwork and knife techniques. Throughout the course, students will collect works to create a portfolio to be evaluated at the end of each semester.  (Spring, Fall)

ART 2103 PAINTING II 
Prerequisites: ART 2093 Painting I
This is an advanced course focusing on the materials and technical aspects of painting with oil or acrylic media.  Students will work from direct observation and reference material as well as exploring the use of media through more experimental techniques.  Students will experiment with the formal and expressive potential of surface and objective and subjective color as well as the psychological effects of color.   Students will learn how to stretch and prepare canvas and work toward finding their own voice and artistic style while creating original art works that show an extremely high level of craftsmanship and presentation. Throughout the course, students will collect works to create a portfolio to be evaluated at the end of each semester.  (Spring, Fall)

ART 2113 DRAWING II 
Prerequisites: ART 2283 Drawing I
This is an advanced drawing course, which builds off the student’s existing drawing skills and knowledge of the medium. The course will emphasize creative exploration and discovery of students’ own aesthetic language, while continuing to introduce and explore a variety of tools and techniques. Emphasis will be placed on the further growth of all aesthetic qualities as they relate to a more complicated visual means of expression.  (Spring)

ART 2123 NATIVE AMERICAN PAINTING 
This course introduces the student to the symbolism, heritage and painting techniques involved in Native American art.

ART 2163 INTERMEDIATE DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY
This course complements ART 2063, Introduction to Digital Photography, with students progressing in the areas of more advanced computer software skills and photography techniques. Upon completion, the students will possess a greater knowledge of color management and file formats, including JPEG, TIFF, and Photoshop files.  (Spring, Fall)

ART 2213 SCULPTURE
Prerequisites: ART 1013 Basic Art I: 2D Design or approval of the instructor
Sculpture is the creative approach to sculptural building techniques and form exploration using a variety of media. This course will focus on idea development, using both traditional and nontraditional three-dimensional materials. It will emphasize conceptual reasoning and consideration of material choice, craft, form, space, site, presentation, and context. It will provide a forum for the discussion and exploration of sculptural practices, and the possibilities made available by such an expansive field.  (Fall)

ART 2233 POTTERY I 
This is an introductory course in the basics of ceramics. Students enrolled in this course need no previous knowledge of art. The course is structured to provide instruction and basic techniques of clay construction and design. Methods of pottery include a variety of hand building techniques and an introduction to wheel throwing. Through this course, students will develop a basic terminology of ceramics as well as being introduced to the glazing and firing process.  (Spring, Fall)

ART 2243 PAINTING III
Prerequisite: ART 2103 Painting II
This course covers advanced exploration of materials and technical aspects of painting.  Students may use their choice of oil or acrylic painting media for this class.  Students will explore the historical concepts of painting and contrast them to contemporary methods. Students will have the opportunity to concentrate on developing their individual concepts and means of personal expression while creating a substantial body of work.  (Spring, Fall)

ART 2263 POTTERY II 
Prerequisite: ART 2233 Pottery I
Pottery II is a course in advanced pottery, building off of previous knowledge and experience with clay. This course continues to develop the students’ skills in a variety of techniques including hand building and wheel throwing. Students will continue their experience and gain further knowledge in glazing and firing processes, as well as building their ceramics vocabulary. Students will also be given an opportunity to explore their own ideas and personal style in the creation of a body of work.  (Spring, Fall)

ART 2283 DRAWING I
The impulse to draw is instinctive and the act of drawing is a vital tool in the creative process of making art.  This course is an introduction to drawing and emphasis will be on representational and expressive drawing through direct observation.  The process of drawing, as well as composition, light and shade, figure-ground relationship, proportion, perspective, and line quality will be explored in a variety of media.  The student will develop a working knowledge of linear perspective and gain experience in using other various means for creating an illusion of spatial depth within a drawing.  (Spring)

ART 2443 ART IN MOVIE MAKING
Storytelling using the visual mediums of film and video is a collaborative process, utilizing dozens of creative individuals. This course is an examination of the significant roles that artists play in the film, video and social media related industries.  (Spring, Fall)

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ASTRONOMY

ASTR 1614 ASTRONOMY WITH LAB
Prerequisites: none
This course is designed to examine the history and principles of astronomy. Topics related to the solar system, stars, galaxies and universe are covered. Includes a hands-on practical experience in areas including optics, optical telescopes, modeling of our solar system, use of a telescope, and nighttime observation of constellations. This course will satisfy physical science requirements for graduation. 3 hours lecture credit, 1 hour lab credit. 

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BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE

BISC 1113 BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS
Prerequisites: none
This course is designed to provide fundamental information concerning life and life processes with an introduction to the integration between structure and function. Introduction of principles at the major levels of biological organization is included. This course will satisfy the lecture-only life science requirement for graduation and is not intended for health or science majors. 3 hours lecture credit.  (Spring)

BISC 1114 BIOLOGY WITH LAB
Prerequisites: none
This course includes fundamental information concerning life and life processes with an introduction to the integration of structure and function.  Application of principles at the major levels of biological organization is included in both lecture and laboratory.  3 hours lecture credit, 1 hour lab credit.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

BISC 1115 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY WITH LAB
Prerequisites: none
This course includes an introduction to the integration between structure and function among all levels of biological organization.  Application of principles utilizing the scientific method for studying cell structure/function, evolution, genetics, anatomy, physiology, and ecology are emphasized.  The investigative laboratory introduces important techniques and methodologies used to develop critical thinking and problem solving skills with additional comprehensive instrumentation, observation, and evaluation utilizing “hypothesis-based” inquiry.  This course is intended for Pre-Professional Science majors-Life Science option.   3 hours lecture credit, 2 hours lab credit.  (Spring, Fall)

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BOTANY

BOT 1114 BOTANY WITH LAB
Prerequisites: none
This course is a study of morphology, anatomy, and physiology of plants with emphasis in phylogenetic relationships. Plant ecology, variation heredity and economic importance are included. 3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab credit.  

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BUSINESS

BUS 1103 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 
This course is an overview of modern business and an introduction to various functions of business such as economics, management, marketing, finance, business law, and government involvement.  (Fall)

BUS 1353 BUSINESS ETHICS 
This course introduces students to traditional concepts of ethical behavior, as they apply to the challenges of conducting business in the modern marketplace. The student will be encouraged to develop an understanding of ethics that is both legally and philosophically defensible by examination of notable moral failures in the business environment. Special emphasis will be given to the definition of ethical terms, recognition of the potential costs and benefits of ethical business behavior, and the application of this knowledge to actual business scenarios.  (Spring, Fall)

BUS 2001-4 BUSINESS SEMINAR 
This course presents studies in selected topics in business.

BUS 2093 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 

ENGL 1113 English Composition I and ENGL 1213 English Composition II and SPCH 1113 Fundamentals of Speech are recommended or approval of the instructor.

This course is a study and analysis of business and industrial communication problems, an analysis into communication theory and instruction and practice in effective communications, including the memorandum, letters, various business reports, proposals, and professional oral presentations.  (Fall)

BUS 2163 BUSINESS LAW 
This is an introductory course covering the principles of law as applied to contracts, warranties, commercial paper, agencies, types of business organizations, sales, property, bailment’s, bankruptcy, and government regulations.  (Spring)

BUS 2513 BUSINESS STATISTICS
Prerequisite: MATH 1513 College Algebra
This course focuses on techniques for descriptive and inferential measures with emphasis on business applications. Topics covered include scientific decision making, data summary techniques, frequency distributions, probability, sampling, and hypothesis testing.  (Fall)

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CHEMISTRY

CHEM 1215 CHEMISTRY I WITH LAB
Prerequisite: MATH 0123 Intermediate Algebra or required score on placement exam.
This course covers the fundamental facts, laws, principles, theories, and concepts of chemistry necessary for further work in science related subjects. There is a strong emphasis on the essential features of atomic structure, nomenclature, periodic properties, chemical bonding, molecular geometries of organic and inorganic compounds, stoichiometry, the reactions and properties of solutions, gas laws, and thermochemistry.  4 hours lecture; 1 hour lab credit.

CHEM 1315 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I WITH LAB 
Prerequisite: Math 1513 College Algebra
This course includes the fundamental principles of this discipline such as the philosophy of chemistry, atomic theory and structure, types of compounds and chemical nomenclature, states of matter, solutions and ionization, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, molecular bonding and structure, electron distribution and atomic spectra, nature of gases, acids and bases, and thermochemistry. Laboratory activities will correspond with the topics in lecture and will serve to reinforce these concepts through hands-on learning.  This course is designed for students with strong math and science ability who typically progress to CHEM 1415: General Chemistry II with Lab. 4 hours lecture; 1 hour lab credit.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

CHEM 1415 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II WITH LAB
Prerequisite: CHEM 1315 General Chemistry I with Lab (or equivalent)
A continuation of CHEM 1315 General Chemistry I with Lab to include a study of chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, solubility products, redox reactions, electrochemistry, chemical thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, metallic/transitional elements, qualitative analysis, organic chemistry / biochemistry and nuclear chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on chemical analysis utilizing instrumental methods. Laboratory activities will correspond with the topics in lecture and will serve to reinforce these concepts through hands-on learning. 3 hours lecture; 2 hours lab credit.  (Spring)

CHEM 2115 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I WITH LAB 
Prerequisites: CHEM 1315 Chemistry I with Lab (or equivalent) 
This course provides students with a study of carbon and its compounds (inclusive of major functional groups except those taught in Organic Chemistry II). The study will place emphasis on organic molecular structures and nomenclature, synthesis and other reactions, stereochemistry and reaction mechanisms and an introduction to instrumental methods of analysis. Laboratory activities will include selected experiments involving the properties, preparation, analysis, and separation of organic compounds. Emphasis will be placed on tradition “wet” methods and an introduction to instrumental methods of analysis such as nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) and infrared spectroscopy. Lecture (3 semester credits) and laboratory (2 semester credits) are combined. 

CHEM 2125 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II WITH LAB
Prerequisite:  CHEM 1415 Chemistry II with Lab (or equivalent)
This course provides students with a continued study of organic compounds (primarily biochemistry and those functional groups not covered in Organic Chemistry I). The study will place emphasis on molecular structures and nomenclature, synthesis and other reactions, stereochemistry and reaction mechanisms and an introduction to instrumental methods of analyzing these compounds (e.g. electrophoresis, nmr, and infrared spectroscopy). Experiments and excursions will be included to provide students with “hands-on” activities to include calibration of instruments, chemical analysis, and graph interpretation. 3 hours lecture; 2 hours lab credit. 

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CHILD DEVELOPMENT

CD 2001-4 CHILD DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR 
This course includes special topic courses offered as the need arises in the areas of child development, early childhood education, and parenting education. Mini-courses or workshops also are included.

CD 2023 NUTRITION, HEALTH AND SAFETY FOR CHILDREN 
This course covers how to establish and maintain physically and psychologically safe and healthy learning environments for children. Emphasis is on understanding the developmental consequences of stress and trauma, protective factors and resilience, the development of mental health and the importance of supportive relationships. Also covered are basic nutrition and health and safety management practices for young children, including specific procedures for infants and toddlers and procedures regarding childhood illness and communicable diseases. Discussion will include ways to recognize signs of emotional distress, child abuse and neglect in young children and the responsibility and procedures for reporting known or suspected abuse or neglect to appropriate authorities. Analysis of the USDA Dietary Guidelines and the application of those guidelines to planning meals and snacks for children are also covered. The course combines classroom instruction, hands-on activities and observations of children in group care.  (Spring)

CD 2043 PARENT AND COMMUNITY RELATIONS 
This course is designed to prepare early childhood professionals who have the ability to establish and maintain positive collaborative relationships with families, who can respect parents’ choices and goals for children and communicate effectively with parents about curriculum and children’s progress and who can involve families in assessing and planning for individual children, including children with disabilities, developmental delays or special abilities and support parents in making decisions related to their child’s development and parenting. The content includes how professionals can become aware of educational resources available in the community. Participation in and planning of family and community activities that relate to the early childhood profession is also a part of the course. Also listed as SOC 2043.  (Summer, Fall)

CD 2053 CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 
This course emphasizes the knowledge necessary to understand factors that influence the development of young children and the sequence and interdependency of physical, social, emotional, cognitive and language development in children from birth to age eight. Covered also is the development and interdependency of all developmental areas to meet the needs of the group and individual while respecting each child’s unique rates of development. The course combines classroom instruction, hands-on activities and observation of children in group care to develop competence in working with young children. Also listed as SOC 2153.  (Fall)

CD 2063 BEHAVIOR AND GUIDANCE OF YOUNG CHILDREN 
This course emphasizes the knowledge necessary to provide positive child guidance strategies which help children learn to make responsible decisions regarding their own behavior and contributes to the development of self-control, self-motivation and self-respect. This course also outlines common causes of inappropriate classroom behavior. Also covered will be the roles families play and how routines, classroom arrangement and the activities provided have a direct effect on a child’s behavior. The course combines classroom instruction, hands-on activities and observation of children in group care to develop competence in working with young children. Also listed as SOC 2163.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

CD 2073 MUSIC, MOVEMENT AND CREATIVE ARTS
This course emphasizes the acquisition of the knowledge of and ability to develop and implement meaningful, integrated learning experiences, using the central concepts and tools of inquiry in music, movement, creative arts and perceptual motor development. Understanding and appreciating the role of the arts in the development of young children and providing children with meaningful experiences in the arts is also covered. The course combines classroom instruction, hands-on activities and observations of children in group care to develop competence in the design and implementation of curriculum and instructional strategies related to music, movement and creative arts.  (Spring, Fall)

CD 2101—PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT
In this course, the student begins compiling a professional portfolio. The portfolio will be developed around the state standards for early childhood education and the standards of the National Association for Education of Young Children. The portfolio will continue to be developed throughout the degree program. (Spring)

CD 2103 EDUCATION AND SERVICES FOR CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
This course is designed to provide an understanding of conditions which affect children’s development and learning, including risk factors, developmental variations and developmental patterns of specific disabilities. Content covers how to create and modify environments and experiences to meet the individual needs of children with disabilities, developmental delays and special abilities. The course also includes opportunities to evaluate and demonstrate appropriate use of technology with young children, including assistive technologies. Knowledge of state and federal legislation related to providing services for children with disabilities and their families is also emphasized. The course combines classroom instruction, hands-on activities and observation of children with special needs.  (Fall)

CD 2173 COGNITIVE SKILLS FOR CHILDREN
This course explores theories of cognitive development and learning styles. Discussion will center on how to integrate curriculum and instructional strategies to encourage children’s critical thinking, problem solving, performance and technological skills. The course combines classroom instruction, hands-on activities and observations of children in group care and it provides opportunities to apply theories of cognitive development and learning styles to the design, development, implementation and modification of differing instructional approaches based upon children’s individual cognitive development and learning styles. (Summer, Fall)

CD 2183 LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL SKILLS FOR CHILDREN
This course explores methods of skill development in encouraging children’s language and social development. Emphasis will be on 1) developing an understanding of emergent literacy theories and practices, 2) learning how to encourage classroom environments that foster positive dispositions toward literacy and 3) learning the processes and strategies for fostering young children’s writing skills, reading skills and second language acquisition skills. The course combines classroom instruction, hands-on activities and observations of children in group care.  (Spring)

CD 2203 PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT
This course provides the opportunity to plan, implement and evaluate an integrated curriculum that focuses on children’s needs and interests and takes into account culturally valued content and children’s home experiences. Content will cover how to create, evaluate and select developmentally appropriate materials, equipment and environments that support children’s learning. The course will also focus on the design, implementation and evaluation of programs that address the importance of a multicultural approach to early childhood education. The course combines classroom instruction, hands-on activities and observations of children in group care. (Spring)

CD 2223 PROFESSIONALISM IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT
This course prepares students to become early childhood professionals who reflect on their practices, articulate a philosophy and rational for decisions and continually self-assess and evaluate the effects of their choices and actions on others. Content will explore the early childhood profession and its multiple historical, philosophical and social foundations, including how these foundations influence current thought and practice. Opportunities will be provided to demonstrate a knowledge of and commitment to the professions code of ethical conduct and the importance of seeking out opportunities to grow professionally by locating and using appropriate professional literature, organizations, resources and experiences to inform and improve their practice. (Fall)

CD 2233 ASSESSMENT & EVALUATION OF CHILD GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT 
This course covers the use of informal and formal assessment strategies to plan an individual curriculum and teaching practices based on each child’s growth and development. Emphasis will be on how to observe, record and assess young children’s development and learning and how to engage children in self-assessment for the purpose of planning appropriate programs, environments and interactions and adapting for individual differences. Also covered will be how to develop and use authentic, performance-based assessments of children’s growth and development to assist in planning and to communicate with children and parents. The course combines classroom instruction, hands-on activities and observations of children in group care. (Spring)

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COLLEGE SUCCESS

COL 1111 COLLEGE SUGGESS 
College Success is a recommended course for all incoming freshman. It supplies students with information about campus services and activities, possible career options, and successful college behaviors. The course also provides the student with ongoing contact with a campus representative to offer support and problem-solving assistance. (Fall)

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COMMUNICATIONS

COM 1113 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATIONS 
This course is concerned with the improvement of skills in four areas of communication—listening, speaking, reading and writing. Interpersonal and small group communication is also stressed.

COM 1213 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I 
This is a beginning course designed to develop the receptive and expressive manual communication skills used primarily by American-born persons who are deaf. Emphasis is on acquiring elementary conversational skills through targeted grammar, syntax and vocabulary. The importance of nonverbal factors is incorporated through the use of gestures, pantomime, body language and eye training. 2 semester credit hours lecture; 1 semester credit hour 

COM 2001-3 COMMUNICATIONS SEMINAR 
This course is a study of selected topics in communications and other aspects of the communicative arts.

COM 2113 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II 
Prerequisite: COM 1213 American Sign Language I This course is a continuation of American Sign Language I, with an emphasis on acquiring greater elementary conversational skills through an increase of targeted grammar, syntax and vocabulary. Expanded emphasis is on expressive skills to begin the development of sign language fluency. Completion of COM 1213 American Sign Language I and COM 2113 American Sign Language II should prepare pre-education majors to meet the State foreign language requirement. 2 semester credit hours lecture; 1 semester credit hour lab.

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COMPUTER SCIENCE

CMSC 1113 INTRO TO COMPUTERS AND CONCEPTS
This course involves training in Redlands Community College Blackboard and webmail.  Also, covers computer ethics, vocabulary, internet skills, and file system management.  Includes a very cursory review of spreadsheets, databases, and word-processing.

CMSC 1223 BUSINESS APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE 
This is an introductory, hands-on course providing computer and software experience using the current version of the Microsoft Windows operating system, Internet Explorer and Microsoft Office Professional software which includes MS Word (word processing), MS Excel (spreadsheets), MS PowerPoint (presentations) and MS Access (databases). This course fulfills the Redlands Community College computer literacy requirement.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

CMSC 2001-4 COMPUTER SCIENCE SEMINAR 
This course is a study of selected topics in computer science.

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CJ 1113 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
This course is an overview of the agencies and processes involved in the administration of justice to those accused and convicted of violating the criminal law. Agency problems and due process issues related to law enforcement, prosecution, adjudication, sentencing and confinement of offenders are discussed.  (Spring, Fall)

CJ 1223 INTRODUCTION TO LAW ENFORCEMENT 
This course is a description and analysis of law enforcement history and current practice. The complex role of American police agents at all levels of government, models of police service, critical issues affecting law enforcement practice and the progress toward professionalism are emphasized.  (Spring)

CJ 1243 TRAFFIC INVESTIGATION AND ENFORCEMENT 
Prerequisite: CJ 2313 Criminal Law or CJ 2443 Criminal Law and Procedure
Recommendation: Completion of CJ 1223 Introduction to Law Enforcement is helpful.
This course is an in-depth description of police responsibility in traffic control, organization of traffic duties and accident investigation and reports. The course includes a discussion of safety precaution and procedures and an introduction to procedures for reports including DUI reporting.  (Fall)

CJ 1253 AMERICAN CORRECTIONS SYSTEM 
This course is a description and analysis of the history of correctional thought and practice, the agencies and personnel responsible for carrying out criminal sentences and the rights and restrictions which apply to criminal offenders.  (Fall)

CJ 1313 PATROL PROCEDURES
Prerequisite: CJ 2313 Criminal Law or CJ 2443 Criminal Law and Procedure
This course is an in-depth description of police responsibility in patrol functions and concepts, routine patrol duties, citizen contacts and response to police calls. The course includes an in-depth discussion of misdemeanor and felony traffic stops, patrol techniques, mechanics of arrest, officer survival and other patrol occurrences.  (Summer)

CJ 2001-4 CRIMINAL JUSTICE SEMINAR 
This course presents studies in selected topics of criminal justice.

CJ 2043 REPORT WRITING
Prerequisite: ENGL 1113 English comp I; CJ 2343 criminal investigation
This course focuses on the skills necessary for job-related and academic writing skills in law enforcement and criminal justice. Emphasis is placed upon writing narrative reports for incidents and fatality and non-fatality traffic accidents, search warrant affidavits and returns, memos, letters, short reports, proposals, resumes and research papers. Writing assignments will be based upon work-related scenarios relevant to law enforcement.  (Spring)

CJ 2053 ORGANIZED CRIME AND GANGS 
Understanding Organized Crime provides a comprehensive introduction to the subject of organized crime. This course covers the complex and controversial issues associated with organized crime. Topics covered include the various definitions of organized crime, why it continues to exist, how it has evolved throughout history and different types of organized crime factions. Students will learn about organized crime and how law-enforcement practitioners today are counteracting these prevailing criminal organizations.  (Spring)

CJ 2063 UNDERSTANDING VIOLENCE AND VICTIMIZATION
Understanding Violence and Victimization, explores selected types of violence and examines the causes and responses to such victimization. It addresses topics such as domestic violence, stranger violence, workplace violence, school violence, criminal justice violence and the violence of terrorism.  (Fall)

CJ 2073 DRUGS AND SOCIETY
This course offers an interdisciplinary, comprehensive survey of all aspects of the drug and alcohol abuse issue, including the impact of drugs on our society; their history and the pharmacological impact of drugs on the body; drug policy implications; the criminal justice system response; the effects, treatment and prevention of abuse; theories of use; the drug business; and drug law enforcement.  (Fall)

CJ 2083 SERIAL KILLERS
This course provides the students with a model of the crime scene actions of serial murderers based on information available. The course also gives an overview of the related scientific knowledge, introduces methods to classify the serial predator and presents a classification model of serial murderers and their crime scene behaviors based on empirical and repeatable studies, the course will discuss advances in the areas of police investigations, etiology and treatment possible.  (Fall)

CJ 2093 INTRODUCATION TO TERRORISM
Introduction to Terrorism will provide students with a working knowledge of people, ideas, organizations and current issues in the field. This course covers the historical and contemporary issues relating to terrorism. (Spring)

CJ 2101-4 PRACTICUM IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
This course provides an opportunity to gain practical experience in a criminal justice setting.  (Spring)

CJ 2201-4 SPECIFIC PROBLEMS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
This course presents selected studies of current social problems in criminal justice.

CJ 2313 CRIMINAL LAW
This course is a study of the nature of criminal law, its philosophical and historical development, the definition and elements of major offenses in the criminal codes of all levels of government and the penalties which attach to those convicted of committing crimes. Oklahoma statutes are used as illustrations.  (Fall)

CJ 2333 POLICE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT 
This course is a description of the principles of organization, leadership and management as applied to law enforcement agencies and personnel at all levels of government. The role of agency executives and major issues affecting personnel administration are discussed.  (Spring)

CJ 2343 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION 
Prerequisites: CJ 2313 Criminal Law or CJ 2443 Criminal Law and Procedures.
This course is an examination of investigative fundamentals and principles which apply to crime scene processing, case building and preparation and case presentation in court. Emphasis is given to case investigation models, developing leads, theory building, conceptual approaches to the investigative mandate and information processing and reporting.  (Spring)

CJ 2353 THE ADMINISTRATION OF CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTIONS 
This course is a study of the organization, management and leadership of institutions which confine offenders. The course includes discussion of short-term detention facilities, jails, prisons, personnel issues, staff-inmate relations and the future directions of institutional design and administration.  (Spring)

CJ 2433 COMMUNITY AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY
This course is an examination of the conflict, both historical and current, which prevents criminal justice agencies and various communities from forming lasting partnerships directed toward the control of crime and peaceful relations. New approaches to criminal justice, interpersonal relations and the role of the media in dramatizing racial and ethical differences are discussed.  (Spring)

CJ 2443 CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE 
This course is a study of the rules and case laws which define the legal methods for conducting arrests and searches, using force, conducting trials, introducing evidence, assigning legal counsel and supervising offenders in the community and institutions.  (Spring)

CJ 2451 CUSTODY AND CONTROL
Corequisite: CJ 2461 Defensive Driving and CJ 2471 Firearms
Prerequisite: Approval of the Instructor 
This course instructs students in the necessary attitudes, knowledge and psychomotor skills in the area of weaponless (open hand) subject control, intermediate range weapons use and self-defense techniques. The course also instructs students in how to negate or minimize the use of excessive and unnecessary deadly force to meet legal review. It covers the need and use of verbal commands in the law enforcement environment.

CJ 2453 PROBATION, PAROLE AND COMMUNITY TREATMENT 
This course is an examination of the most common and the new methods of supervising offenders in the community. The structure, management and personnel of probation, parole, and other correctional services, as well as innovative approaches to working with offenders such as house arrest, electronic monitoring, and intensive supervision, are discussed.  (Fall)

CJ 2461 DEFENSIVE DRIVING
Corequisite: CJ 2451 Custody and Control and CJ 2471 Firearms
Prerequisite: Approval of the Instructor 
This course is an overview of the legal aspects of law enforcement driving. Instruction in the skills of desirable law enforcement driving behavior is covered both in theory and application.

CJ 2471 FIREARMS
Corequisite: CJ 2451 Custody and Control and CJ 2461 Defensive Driving
Prerequisite: Approval of the Instructor 
This course provides knowledge and understanding of the procedures for safety and legal handling of firearms. It also emphasizes the mechanical functions and basic maintenance procedures of service revolvers. Instruction in the basics of marksmanship, with emphasis placed on the mental process involved in various shoot/don’t shoot situations, is covered both in theory and application.

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EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER MANAGEMENT

ECM 2123 EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER FINANCIAL PLANNING & MANAGEMENT
This course is designed to provide practical experience in designing and managing a financial plan and budget, as well as guidelines and tools for complying with or amending a budget. Content covered will include examination of budget categories, analysis of the expenditure ad income sides of the budget, exploration of basic budgetary terms and tools, examination of the benefits of a financial plan and analysis of personal financial planning and management skills and habits and how these skills and habits could impact the manner in which the professional would manage an early childhood center. Also included will be the development of an early childhood center business plan.  (Spring)

ECM 2133 EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER PERSONNEL DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT
This course is designed to study the principles, procedures and organizational techniques currently utilized by business in the development and management of personnel. It includes a study of current developments within the general field of personnel development and management, including employment practices, employee assessment and evaluation, orientation, training programs, related federal and state legislation, regulations and orders, workforce diversity, employee and employer/management relations and compensation management.

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ECONOMICS

ECON 1353 PERSONAL FINANCE 
This course is a study of economic and personal goals including personal budgeting, credit buying, borrowing money, banking facilities, the nature of investments, life insurance, casualty insurance, medical insurance, home ownership, stocks and bonds and retirement plans.  (Spring, Fall)

ECON 2001-4 SEMINAR IN ECONOMICS 
This course is a study of selected topics in economics.

ECON 2193 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS
This is a fundamental course in economic principles as they relate to supply, demand and the market system. Emphasis is given to national economic issues such as national income, economic growth and development, economic fluctuations, fiscal policy and monetary policy. Global economics subjects include balance of payments and the foreign exchange market.  (Spring, Fall)

ECON 2203 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS
This is a fundamental course in economic principles as they relate to supply, demand and the market system. Concepts covering consumer choice, distribution of income and resource markets are presented. Emphasis is given to production, cost and pricing relationships of the basic market structures. Global economic subjects include trade policies and trade agreements.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

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EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY

EMT 1118 EMT BASIC (EMT)
Pre-requisites: The student be 18 years of age by no more than 90 days after the specified ending date of the course.
This is the second level within the National (EMS) Education Standards, and this course is designed to provide the basic techniques of emergency prehospital care, preparing the student for State licensure by examination as an EMT. The course covers all emergency medical techniques that conform to the National Scope of Practice for EMT in the State of Oklahoma, in accordance with the National EMS Education Standards. The course is also the primary prerequisite to be eligible for the Advanced EMT (AEMT) course and the Paramedic Program. It consists of a minimum of 212 hours of classroom and lab instruction and 48 clinical hours in a supervised clinical setting.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

EMT 1129 ADVANCED EMT (AEMT)
Pre-requisites: EMT 1118 Emergency Medical Technician.
This course is designed for those who have successfully completed EMT.  It is the third level within the National EMS Education Standards.  The course includes a minimum of 256 hours of classroom and lab instruction and 140 supervised clinical hours in a variety of EMS and hospital settings.  Content covers advanced airway management with direct laryngoscopy endotracheal intubation, indirect intubation with blind insertion devices/tubes, and oxygen therapy.  The student will also learn the use and administration intravenous therapy and fluid therapy as well as the administration of some pharmacologic therapy.  These advanced procedures and therapies supplement and enhance the knowledge and skills previously learned as an EMT. (Spring, Summer, Fall)

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ENGLISH

ENGL 0013 FUNDAMENTALS OF READING AND WRITING
This course is offered to give students an opportunity to improve their basic reading and writing skills through a curriculum of vocabulary and comprehension and rules of grammar and organization.  Assignments will focus on application of reading and writing skills for the college classroom as well as practical life environments.  Students must earn a letter grade of a “C” or higher to continue the English course sequence.

ENGL 0023 COLLEGE READING AND WRITING
Co-Requisite:  ENGL 1113 English Composition I
This course assists students in developing reading and writing strategies that will benefit them for success in future college classes in their chosen academic programs.  Emphasis will be placed on the importance of developing listening, reading, and writing skills.  Students will focus on the foundational building blocks of reading and writing to enhance their success in the co-requisite English Composition I experience.

ENGL 1101 LIBRARY AND INTERNET RESEARCH SKILLS
Using a combination of class discussion and focused small-group activities, students will gain experience and confidence in their ability to research a topic and find appropriate resources. This course will focus not only on library research, but also Internet research, since that is where the majority of people get their information today.  (Spring, Fall)

ENGL 1113 ENGLISH COMPOSITION I 
This course focuses on the skills necessary to compose written communication that is logical, appropriate and effective. Emphasis is on careful organization and the development of the multi-paragraph expository essay. Students in this course will write a research paper using the Modern Language Association (MLA) style manual.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

ENGL 1213 ENGLISH COMPOSITION II 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1113 English Composition I
This course is a continuation of English Composition I. Students will reinforce and extend their abilities to write correctly and effectively. Emphasis will be placed on research writing using rhetorical strategies and stylistic techniques. Students will gain practice in research, logic, argumentation and documentation through writing multiple research papers. MLA will be the preferred documentation style for composition papers, but other documentation styles will be discussed.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

ENGL 2001-3 ENGLISH SEMINAR 
This course is a study of selected topics in English.

ENGL 2033 TECHNICAL WRITING AND PROFESSIONAL REPORT WRITING 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1113 English Composition I
This course offers practice in organizing and structuring ideas in a professional style for such business correspondence as letters, memorandums, job applications, resumes and proposals. Emphasis will be placed on writing technical and professional reports which are clear, concise and accurate. Experience in designing and incorporating figures, graphs, tables and charts in reports will be included.

ENGL 2413 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1113 English Composition I
This course reviews the major types of literature: short stories, poetry, drama, essays and biographies. Representative selections are read, discussed and analyzed with consideration for themes, mood, style, tone, language and other related characteristics. It introduces literary criticism and a study of authors in relation to their writings.  (Fall)

ENGL 2423 INTRODUCTION TO FICTION 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1113 English Composition I
This course develops a basis for the interpretation, evaluation and appreciation of fiction, particularly the novel and short story. Representative sections are read, discussed and analyzed, with consideration for themes, mood, characterization, style, tone, language and other related characteristics. It introduces literary criticism.

ENGL 2433 AMERICAN LITERATURE I
Prerequisite: ENGL 1113 English Composition I
This course is designed to develop and enhance skills in literary interpretation. Reading selections include short stories, poetry, drama, biographies and essays.

ENGL 2443 AMERICAN LITERATURE II
Prerequisite: ENGL 1113 English Composition I
This course is designed to increase the ability to discern literary techniques in the various genres and to use this knowledge as a basis for interpreting literature. Reading selections include examples from each of the five genres.

ENGL 2453 INTRODUCTION TO POETRY 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1113 English Composition I
This course is a study of poetry as literary art with emphasis on understanding, recognizing and appreciating poetic techniques and forms and the rhetoric of verse. Representative works are read, discussed and analyzed with emphasis on theme, structure and language.  (Summer)

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ENOLOGY

ENO 1103 INTRODUCTION TO WINE MICROORGANISMS
This course is an introduction to the variety of microorganisms frequently encountered in the wine making process both beneficial and harmful.  Topics include identification, physiology, morphology, and biochemistry of various wine microorganisms. (Spring, Fall)

ENO 1463 INTRODUCTION TO ENOLOGY
This is a course based on the fundamentals of the science and technology of winemaking. Introduction to Enology targets the home winemaker and those interested in exploring winemaking as a career, either as a cellar worker or as a new winery owner. During this course, students will build a basic understanding of winemaking, including making wine from a kit. This course is part of VESTA's viticulture and enology program with emphasis on the practical aspects of winemaking. (Spring, Fall)

ENO 2101-2104 ENOLOGY PRACTICUM
The Winery Practicum is designed to give students the opportunity to work in an established vineyard and interact with a qualified mentor. (Spring, Fall)

ENO 2123 ANALYSIS OF MUST AND WINE
Prerequisites: ENO 1113 Introduction to Enology and ENO 2112 Intermediate Enology
Principles of grape juice and wine analysis and the reasons for use of each analysis. Analyses of a practical and useful nature are chosen for the laboratory exercises demonstrating various chemical, physical and biochemical methods. Students will participate in workshops and hands-on experiences at participating wineries. (Spring, Fall) 

ENO 2462 INTERMEDIATE ENOLOGY
Prerequisite:  ENO 1463 or permission
This course in the science and technology of winemaking is intended for the experienced intermediate winemaker, the winery employee interested in career development, or the advanced home winemaker that is seeking new challenges. Basic organic chemistry, microbiology, and some mathematics familiarity are recommended. (Fall)

ENO 2663 SENSORY EVALUATION
Prerequisite:  ENO 1463 or permission
This is a course intended for those individuals who need to develop an understanding of the principles of sensory evaluation used in commercial wine making. It will also be of benefit to the wine enthusiast who is interested in reaching advanced levels of appreciation as well as to the producer, the wine merchant, and ultimately the enologist, who by the nature of their profession need to discern flavors and establish tasting benchmarks.  Students will utilize sensory kits and workshops to further their sensory evaluation skills and techniques.  Students must be 21. (Spring, Fall)

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EQUINE SCIENCE

EQSC 1013 INTRODUCTION TO EQUINE ASSISTED ACTIVITIES AND THERAPY
This course is an overview of and orientation to EAAT (equine–assisted activities and therapy) and serves as an introduction to therapy horse characteristics, basic concepts of instructor criteria and the characteristics of therapy participants. 3 hours credit (Fall Only)

EQSC 1133 EQUINE HANDLING AND CARE
Course familiarizes students with different aspects of equine management through a practical and hands-on approach. Topics include selection, fit and care of English and Western tack, bits, grooming, clipping, wound care, safe bandaging techniques, equine behavior and equine transportation. Students will have hands-on experience. 2 hours lecture credit; 1 hour lab credit. (Fall)

EQSC 1143 EQUINE SELECTION AND EVALUATION
This course covers topics related to the evaluation and selection of horses for use in therapeutic and non-therapeutic programs. (Spring)

EQSC 1153 EQUINE EQUIPMENT AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT
Operation of equine equipment and maintenance of equine facilities, to include tack, trailers, buildings and fences. Development of the essential skills and technical information needed to manage and supervise equine facilities and equipment. 2 hours lecture credit; 1 hour lab credit. (Spring)

EQSC 1213 HORSEMANSHIP
This course presents the fundamentals of basic riding skills – Western and English – and the adjustment of equipment. 1 hour lecture credit; 2 hours lab credit. (Fall)

EQSC 2213 PRINCIPLES OF THERAPEUTIC RIDING INSTRUCTION
Principles and theory of teaching therapeutic riding, including special considerations of teaching in a therapeutic environment and methods of instruction for individuals with a variety of disabilities. To include observing, assisting and practice-teaching.   1 hour lecture credit; 2 hours lab credit. (Spring)

EQSC 2223 EQUINE NUTRITION AND HEALTH
This course covers the basics of equine nutrition and principles of feeding. The students will apply guidelines for feeding horses based on use. Students will able to identify diseases and parasites affecting horses and apply preventative measures. Students will develop and maintain health records. Students will have hands-on experience and take on feeding and health care responsibilities. (Fall)

EQSC 2304 EQUINE INTERNSHIP
This course is designed to enhance students’ classroom experience. The internship will provide opportunities to gain further insight of a riding program or a therapeutic riding center and is designed to prepare students for instructor certification. 4 hours credit (Spring Only)

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GEOGRAPHY

GEG 2243 HUMAN GEOGRAPHY 
This is a basic course covering the human race’s relationship to its environment. The course explores areas such as cultural comparisons of resource utilization, differences in levels of economic development and environmental influences on cultural development.  (Fall)

GEG 2253 WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY 
This is a basic course covering the relationship of the human to the environment. This course explores areas such as cultural comparisons of resource utilization, differences in levels of economic development and physical and environmental influences on cultural development.  (Spring)

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GEOLOGY

GEOL 1053 EARTH SCIENCE
This is a survey course of geology, which includes the study of geologic forces in the earth such as volcanism, earthquakes, plate tectonics, mountain building, gravitation, weathering, erosion, sedimentation, groundwater, glaciation, ocean events and fossilization. The course presents the composition of the earth’s interior with concentration on the crust and techniques of reading the geologic history from Precambrian eras to present through the story told by the three basic types of rocks, how they form and where they are found in relation to one another. This course will satisfy the lecture-only physical science requirement for graduation and is not intended for health or science majors. 3 hours lecture credit.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

GEOL 1054 PHYSICAL GEOLOGY WITH LAB
This is a beginning course in geology, which includes the study of topographic maps, rocks and minerals, geological process and agents, landforms, weathering, running water, ground water, glaciers, gravity and volcanism. The course includes a hands-on study of the properties of minerals and rocks, how to read maps-topographic and geologic and some interpretation of geologic formation. This course will satisfy the physical science requirement for graduation. 3 hours lecture credit, 1 hour lab credit.  (Spring, Fall)

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HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, & RECREATION

HPER 1191 SPORTS PARTICIPATION 
This course offers competition in basketball, baseball and volleyball. It may be repeated for a maximum of four credit hours in each sport. Each enrollment will specify the sport in which the student is engaged.  (Spring, Fall)

HPER 1201 SUPER CIRCUIT
Super Circuit is a self-paced course designed for each student to learn to use weight machines in an aerobic manner. Implementation of the use of weight machines with aerobic stations presents an opportunity to gain optimal level of physical fitness.  (Spring, Fall)

HPER 1241 BODY BUILDING FOR WOMEN
Body Building means more than just lifting weights. It means knowing how to shape and contour the body along with staying physically fit. This course is designed for female students to have individual programs for their optimal level of fitness.  (Fall)

HPER 1243 INTRODUCTION TO ATHLETIC TRAINING
This course is an introduction to methods of prevention and immediate care of athletic injuries. It covers basic information concerning the health and well-being of athletes.  (Spring)

HPER 1252 ORIENTATION TO EXERCISE SCIENCE 
An orientation to exercise science will be will be given by exploring the various sub-disciplines of motor behavior, biomechanics, exercise physiology, exercise psychology, pedagogy, and sport.  It will also offer a look at career opportunities in the field of exercise science, along with philosophy, goals, and issues of health and physical activity in our society.  (Fall)

HPER 1302 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
This course is designed as an introduction to the profession of physical education. It includes a brief history, the philosophy and modern trends of physical education, teacher qualifications, vocational opportunities, expected competencies and skills testing.  (Spring, Fall)

HPER 1312 FOUNDATIONS OF RECREATION 
This course is designed to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in the basic outdoor recreation activities in the community setting.

HPER 1322 PERSONAL HEALTH 
This course is a study of the principles from natural, biological, social and behavioral sciences as they may be applied to healthful living. It emphasizes knowledge, attitudes and practices related to self-direction of healthy behavior.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

HPER 1512 THEORY OF BASKETBALL 
This course is designed to teach the fundamental skills, techniques and concepts of the game for the athlete or prospective coach. (Fall)

HPER 1532 THEORY OF BASEBALL 
This course is designed to teach the fundamental skills, techniques and concepts of the game for the athlete or prospective coach. (Fall)

HPER 1553 LIFETIME FITNESS AND MANAGEMENT 
This course is designed to assist in developing and enhancing health and physical fitness. Fitness activity and wellness will be studied in order to assist in the development of regular exercise, stress management and proper nutrition. This course meets the institutional physical education requirement.  (Spring, Fall)

HPER 1601 ATHLETIC/PERSONAL TRAINING PRACTICUM I
This practicum provides student athletic and personal trainers basic knowledge dealing with ranges of motion, planes of the body and terminology needed to effectively work in a training room setting.  (Spring, Fall)

HPER 2001-4 PHYSICAL EDUCATION SEMINAR 
This course is a study of special subjects or problems in physical education.  (Fall)

HPER 2103 EXERCISE TESTING AND PRESCRIPTION
This course covers knowledge of anatomy and physiology as it relates to exercise testing and prescription of exercise. Students will learn to administer and interpret screening methodologies as a prerequisite to exercise testing and prescription of exercise. Students will learn to interpret the results of testing and prescribe the appropriate exercise. The course will also exercise protocols for special needs individuals.  (Spring)

HPER 2302 COACHING ATHLETICS 
This is a course of study in the coaching of the major sports to emphasize this phase of physical education. Methods of coaching are studied through lectures, demonstrations, practice and assigned readings. (Spring)

HPER 2312 FIRST AID  
This is a knowledge-based course designed to instruct a student in the emergency care of injuries and sudden illness. Students will be introduced to basic human anatomy and physiology as related to injuries in order to understand how body systems react to injury. Various first aid treatment options will be presented to help students understand why certain treatments are better than others. Prospective coaches, athletic trainers and personal trainers will be presented with knowledge that will help prepare them for periodic skills-based certification coursework.  (Spring)

HPER 2343 CARE AND PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES
This course will give a general knowledge toward injury prevention and immediate care for the most common sports injuries. Basic foundations are also provided in more specific areas of rehabilitation.  (Fall)

HPER 2593 PROTECTIVE TECHNIQUES IN ATHLETIC TRAINING
This course is designed for the student pursuing a career as an Athletic Trainer, for a coach whose school does not have access to athletic training services or for an individual pursuing a career in sport medicine. This course will allow students to develop a basic understanding of the principles of supportive taping and wrapping and custom pad development for the prevention of athletic injuries.  (Spring)

HPER 2601 ATHLETIC TRAINING LEVEL 2
Prerequisite: HPER 1243 Introduction to Athletic Injuries or HPER 1601 Athletic/Personal Training Practicum I
This practicum provides student athletic trainers an understanding of the proper management of serious injuries. Students will get hands-on application of experience on the proper use of ambulatory aid, care for cervical spine injuries and proper neurological assessment of concussions.  (Spring, Fall)

HPER 2611 PERSONAL TRAINING PRACTICUM II
Prerequisite:  HPER 2103 Exercise Testing and Prescription and HPER 1601 Athletic/Personal Training Practicum I
This practicum provides student personal trainers with a clinical setting on the RCC campus. Students will get hands-on application experience in health appraisals and assessments, development and implementation of cardiovascular and strength training programs, reassessment tests including cardio-respiratory fitness, body composition, muscular fitness, flexibility and lower back function.  (Fall)

HPER 2623 PERSONAL TRAINER CERTIFICATION COURSE
Prerequisites: ZOOL 2134 Anatomy with Lab; ZOOL 2144 Physiology with Lab; HPER 2103 Exercise Testing and Prescription; and AHS2013 Nutrition
The course is designed to bridge the gap between clinical exercise science related course work and the practical application skills of personal training. Learn how to properly screen and evaluate clients for safe participation in an exercise program, design and implement exercise prescriptions for multiple populations and goal attainment and apply the principles of exercise in a personal training environment. A Personal Training Certification is available through the National Council for Strength and Fitness upon successful completion of the course.  (Spring, Fall)

HPER 2651 ATHLETIC TRAINING LEVEL 3
Prerequisite:  HPER 2343 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries and HPER 2601 Athletic Training Level 2
This practicum provides student athletic trainers with a clinical setting on the RCC campus. Students will get hands-on application experience to aid in the prevention of athletic injuries, to recognize and care for those that occur, to refer to the appropriate medical specialist and work for complete recovery through rehabilitation, so that RCC athletes may return to full participation as safely and quickly as possible. The practicum takes place over a semester period. During the semester the student will work in the RCC athletic training room and with the athletic teams.  (Spring, Fall)

HPER 2661 PERSONAL TRAINING PRACTICUM III
Prerequisite:  HPER 2343 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries and HPER 2611 Personal Training Practicum II
This practicum provides student personal trainers with a clinical setting in collaboration with selected facilities and programs in the area. Students will be placed under the supervision of qualified professionals in the fitness field to observe and expand their practical and professional knowledge. This invaluable field experience provides exposure to a variety of areas that use personal trainers. Learning opportunities may include working with a Physical Therapist, Commercial Gym Personal Trainer, Corporate Gym Personal Trainer, Hospital Wellness Program, Public School Recreation Department or Private Personal Trainers.  (Spring, Fall)

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HISTORY

HIST 1483 UNITED STATES HISTORY TO 1877 
This course is a general survey of U.S. history from its pre-colonial origins to the end of the Reconstruction Era, with emphasis upon national political, diplomatic, economic, constitutional, social and intellectual developments.  (Spring, Fall)

HIST 1493 UNITED STATES HISTORY, 1877 TO PRESENT 
This course is a general survey of U.S. history from the end of the Reconstruction Era to the present day with emphasis upon national political, diplomatic, economic, constitutional, social and intellectual developments.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

HIST 2001-3 HISTORY SEMINAR 
Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor. This course presents studies in selected topics in history which develop capabilities in historical analysis and creative expression.

HIST 2123 WESTERN CIVILIZATION, ORIGINS TO 1500
This course is an introductory survey of the history of Europe and the Middle East from ancient civilizations to the Renaissance.  The course examines the social, cultural, intellectual, religious, political, and economic developments in civilization prior to 1500.  (Fall)
HIST 2133 WESTERN CIVILIZATION, 1500 TO PRESENT 
This course is an introductory survey of the history of Europe, the Middle East, and the Americas from the Reformation to the present.  The course examines the social, cultural, intellectual, religious, political, and economic developments since 1500.  (Spring)

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HUMANITIES

HUM 2001-3 HUMANITIES SEMINAR 
This course is a study of selected topics in humanities.

HUM 2113 GENERAL HUMANITIES I
Prerequisite: ENGL 1113 English Composition I
This course is a study of significant ideas, discoveries and creative achievements of humanity in the areas of art, music, literature, science, philosophy, religion, industry, technology, ethics, government and law from pre-history through the Renaissance.  (Spring, Fall)

HUM 2173 BELIEFS AND BELIEVERS
This course takes a comprehensive look at the nature and function of the religions and secular beliefs that comprise the major world views, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam and other belief systems that are outside the scope of mainstream religious institutions.  (Spring)

HUM 2223 GENERAL HUMANITIES II
Prerequisite: ENGL 1113 English Composition I
This course is a study of significant ideas, discoveries and creative achievements of humanity in the areas of art, music, literature, science, philosophy, religion, industry, technology, ethics, government and law from the Renaissance through the present.  (Spring)

HUM 2233 HUMANITIES THROUGH THE ARTS 
This course provides a survey of the humanities through art, music, literature and other artistic forms which illustrate the relationships among the arts and the major concerns of humankind. This course covers Classical Greece to the present.

HUM 2243 FILM AS LITERATURE
Film Studies is designed to introduce the students to the aesthetics of film, including how a film is created, how an entire film functions, how to analyze a film critically and how film art has changed throughout history. Students will learn the basics of film form and technique and will apply these principles to films screened in class.  (Spring, Fall)

HUM 2613 LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT STUDIES 
This course provides students an understanding of leadership philosophies, styles and skills needed for them to emerge as responsible, well-prepared leaders and followers who can affect change and enhance the quality of life locally and globally. Servant leadership, ethical leadership, team building, conflict management and resolution, decision making, vision articulation, necessity of change and the empowerment of self and others are components of this course. This course is also offered for “Honors” credit. (Spring)

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MANAGEMENT

MGMT 2001-4 CAREER EDUCATION SEMINAR 
This course is a study of selected topics related to experiential education and career awareness.

MGMT 2033 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT 
This course is designed to present the basic principles of management such as planning, decision making, organizing, staffing, communicating, motivating, leading and controlling. Concepts of management apply to both profit and non-profit organizations.  (Spring)

MGMT 2103 OCCUPATIONAL/TECHNICAL INTERNSHIP
This course is a directed internship experience in an organization at a level requiring specific duties and responsibilities related to the student’s program of study. It is designed to integrate on-campus classroom study with practical hands-on work experience in the student’s major field of study. A student must meet all of the requirements for internship participation including completion of at least 25 credit hours of course work before enrollment with a 2.0 GPA or higher. During the semester of internship, the student is required to provide evidence of an hour log, objectives, and a portfolio outlining internship/work experience.  (Spring)

MGMT 2143 BUSINESS LEADERSHIP
This course is designed to integrate on-campus classroom study with practical hands-on business leadership and professional development opportunities. The student will establish leadership goals in the areas of business leadership, professional development, ethical and diversity responsibilities, problem-solving and community service. The student is required to provide evidence of these goals and their accomplishment by assembling a Business Leadership portfolio. The student will be required to participate in activities in four leadership environments: business, civic/community, educational and social.  (Fall)

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MARKETING

MRKT 2323 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 
This course is designed to cover a systems approach to marketing in both profit and non-profit organizations. Topics include planning and forecasting, market segmentation, social responsibility, consumerism, evaluation of consumer behavior and marketing strategies related to introduction and prolonging of product life cycles, classification of consumer and industrial goods and services, pricing, promotion and distribution channels.  (Fall)

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MATHEMATICS

MATH 0011 BASIC MATH REVIEW
This course presents fundamental operations on integers, common fractions, decimals, and percents and their applications. 

MATH 0153 MATH PREP I
Prerequisite: score on placement exam indicating a need for developmental mathematics. 
Math Prep is a sequence of courses for TRIO Student Support Services’ students which is mastery-based and is designed to prepare students for College Algebra. The first level of topics for math prep includes: Fundamental operations on integers, decimals, fractions, and percentages; geometry, data analysis, and application problems. A second level of topics includes: real numbers, order of operations, algebraic expressions, linear equations, inequalities, graphing, polynomials, and factoring. The third level of topics include: rational expressions and equations, systems of equations, quadratic equations and graphs, radical expressions and equations, and an introduction to functions. The minimum requirement for successful course completion of Math Prep I is level one topics. This course is individualized and does provide opportunity for students to complete more than one level of topics during a semester course. Course instruction is supplemented with a web-based learning system.  ***You must be an AIMS student in order to enroll in this class.*** (Spring, Summer, Fall)

MATH 0163 MATH PREP II
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Math Prep I
Math Prep is a sequence of courses for TRIO Student Support Services’ students which is mastery-based and is designed to prepare students for College Algebra. Math Prep II focuses on level two and level three topics. Level two topics includes: real numbers, order of operations, algebraic expressions, linear equations, inequalities, graphing, polynomials, and factoring. The third level of topics include: rational expressions and equations, systems of equations, quadratic equations and graphs, radical expressions and equations, and an introduction to functions. The minimum requirement for successful course completion of Math Prep II is level two topics. This course is individualized and does provide opportunity for students to complete more than one level of topics during a semester course. Course instruction is supplemented with a web-based learning system.  ***You must be an AIMS student in order to enroll in this class.*** (Spring, Summer, Fall)

MATH 0173 MATH PREP III
Successful completion of Math Prep II
Math Prep is a sequence of courses for TRIO Student Support Services’ students which is mastery-based and is designed to prepare students for College Algebra. Math Prep III focuses on the level three topics: rational expressions and equations, systems of equations, quadratic equations and graphs, radical expressions and equations, and an introduction to functions. The minimum requirement for successful course completion of Math Prep III is level three topics.  This course is individualized, and course instruction is supplemented with a web-based learning system.  ***You must be an AIMS student in order to enroll in this class.*** (Spring, Summer, Fall)

MATH 0234 FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICAL REASONING
This course surveys a variety of mathematical topics needed to prepare students for college-level statistics, quantitative reasoning or STEM path algebraic reasoning course. Topics include: numeracy with an emphasis on estimation and fluency with large numbers; evaluating expressions and formulas; rates, ratios, and proportions; percentages; solving equations; linear models; data interpretations including graphs and tables; verbal, algebraic and graphical representations of functions; exponential models. Any student with an ACT math score < 19 is required to take the math placement exam.

MATH 0512 COLLEGE ALGEBRA REVIEW
Prerequisite:  MATH 0234 Foundations of Mathematical Reasoning with a grade of “C” or higher, or appropriate course placement score.
Co-requisite:  MATH 1513 College Algebra
This course covers the same topics as traditional College Algebra, but in an expanded time format. This allows for increased guided learning activities and learner/instructor interaction.  This expanded format version is designed and required to be taken in conjunction with College Algebra (MATH 1513) to receive full academic credit. (Spring, Fall)

MATH 1023 STRUCTURAL CONCEPTS IN ARITHMETIC I 
This course presents an introduction to problem solving and number theory as they relate to numeration systems, rational numbers, elementary algebra, functions and the use of current technologies. Does not apply toward a major or minor in mathematics. Does not substitute for MATH 1303 or MATH 1513.  (Spring, Summer)

MATH 1123 STRUCTURAL CONCEPTS IN ARITHMETIC II
Prerequisites: MATH 1023 or departmental permission
This course presents the structure of the real number system, functions, statistics, probability and elementary geometric concepts with emphasis on informal geometry. Additionally, use of technology as a teaching tool is introduced. Does not apply toward a major or minor in mathematics.  (Spring, Summer)
MATH 1303 GENERAL QUANTITATIVE REASONING
Pre-requisite of 3 years of high school mathematics OR a required score on placement exam OR equivalent.
This course poses problems that involve quantitative relationships in real-world data by means of numerical, symbolic, and visual representations.  Includes an introduction to basic logical reasoning, basic statistics and probability, interpretation of numerical data, graph reading, hypothesis testing and simple regression.  No previous knowledge of these tools is assumed. Does not apply toward a major in nursing, business, agriculture, science, or mathematics.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

MATH 1473 MATHEMATICS FOR CRITICAL THINKING
Prerequisite: MATH 0123, or required score on placement exam, or an ACT Math sub score of 19.  
A study of the mathematics needed for the critical appraisal of graphs and tables, use of simple mathematical models, and an introduction to elementary statistics.  

MATH 1513 COLLEGE ALGEBRA 
Prerequisite: ACT Math sub score of 19 or appropriate course placement score
This course is designed to require the student to:
·     Solve system of equations: this includes but is not limited to polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, rational, radical and absolute value.
·     Perform operations on functions: identify the properties and characteristics of functions. This includes but is not limited to domain and range, one-to-one, inverse, increasing and decreasing, and asymptotic behavior.
·    Identify and construct graphs and apply their transformations. Graphs include but are not limited to basics graphs, polynomial, rational and piecewise.
·    Apply algebraic concepts to real world problems.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

MATH 1613 TRIGONOMETRY 
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MATH 1513 College Algebra or required score on placement examination.
This course will require the student to evaluate trigonometric functions and their inverses, graph trigonometric functions, prove trigonometric identities, solve trigonometric equations, solve problems involving triangles and indirect measurement, use trigonometric forms of complex numbers, identify and graph polar curves.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

MATH 2001-3 MATHEMATICS SEMINAR 
This course presents selected topics in mathematics, studying areas not covered by the standard curricula.

MATH 2193 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS 
Prerequisite: ACT score of 19 or appropriate score on placement examination or MATH 0234 Foundations of Mathematical Reasoning 
This course will require the student to solve problems applying the concepts of random sampling, elementary probability, testing hypotheses, descriptive measures, chi-square, regression and correlation, and analysis of variance.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

MATH 2103 BUSINESS CALCULUS 
Prerequisite: MATH 1513 College Algebra or required score on placement examination, either within the last year. 
This course is an introductory course in differential and integral calculus to analyze and solve theoretical and applied problems from business, economics, life sciences, and social sciences.  (Spring)

MATH 2714 CALCULUS I 
Prerequisite: MATH 1613 Trigonometry or required score on placement examination within the last year.
This course will require the student to compute, interpret and apply the basic concepts of limits, differentiation and integration to algebraic and transcendental functions and solve applied problems that include rates of change, optimization, area and total change in a function.  (Spring)

MATH 2734 CALCULUS II 
Prerequisite: MATH 2714 Calculus I or required score on placement examination within the last year.
This course will require the student to use integration techniques to find antiderivatives, compute definite integrals, and solve application problems that include volume, length of arc, surface area; investigate the convergence of improper integrals; perform basic operations on vectors and analyze functions of three variables and their contour plots.  (Fall)

MATH 2754 CALCULUS III 
Prerequisite: MATH 2734 Calculus II or required score on placement examination within the last year.
This course will require the student to use infinite series, Taylor polynomials and compute partial derivatives, gradients, differentials, double and triple integrals in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems, curl and divergence of a vector field, and path and surface integrals of vector fields directly and by applying Green’s Theorem, Stokes’ Theorem and the Divergence Theorem; write parameterizations for lines, curves and surfaces; and solve application problems that include optimization, work and flow of vector fields.  (Spring)

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MICROBIOLOGY

MICR 2134 INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY WITH LAB
Prerequisite: Introductory General Chemistry Course and 3 credit hours of life science. 
Introductory course based on the guidelines of the American Society for Microbiology. The core concept of microbial diversity is integrated to include microbial cell biology, microbial genetics and the interactions and impact of microorganisms on humans and on the environment. Laboratory exercises are aimed at reinforcing lecture topics, basic microbiological techniques as well as basic identification and safety techniques. 3 credit hours of lecture and 1 credit hour of laboratory.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

MICR 2135 MICROBIOLOGY WITH LAB 
Prerequisite: Introductory General Chemistry Course and 3 credit hours of life science. 
Introductory majors course based on the guidelines of the American Society for Microbiology. The core concept of microbial diversity is integrated to include microbial cell biology, microbial genetics and the interactions and impact of microorganisms on humans and on the environment. The basic laboratory reinforces lecture topics, basic microbiology techniques as well as basic identification and safety techniques. In addition, the extended laboratory introduces basic techniques of molecular biology such as DNA purification, agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, protein purification, bacterial transformation, in vitro enzyme assays, bacterial bioremediation and antibody detection using the ELISA techniques. 3 credit hours of lecture and 2 credit hours of laboratory.  (Spring)

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MUSIC

MUS 1123 FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSIC 
This course offers hands-on experience in music methods. Emphasized are the five elements of music: rhythm, melody, harmony, form and expression.  (Spring)

MUS 1134 MUSIC THEORY I 
This course is a review of the rudiments of tonal music: scales, key signature, intervals and triads. It incorporates four-part music writing, music analysis, composition and associated skills. Also included is the development of basic aural skills related to sight-reading with rhythmic, melodic and harmonic dictation.  (Fall)

MUS 1234 MUSIC THEORY II 
Prerequisite: MUS 1134 Music Theory I
This course is a continuation of the integrated approach to music theory covering traditional diatonic practice with an expanded study of harmonic progression and part writing, music analysis, ear-training, dictation and sight-singing.  (Spring)

MUS 1343 MUSIC APPRECIATION 
This course is a survey of music from Baroque through the mid-twentieth century, with an introduction of music terminology and the music of antiquity (Middle Ages and Renaissance). Emphasis will be placed on how music relates as an aesthetic experience to life, culture and social activity.  (Fall)

MUS 2001-3 MUSIC SEMINAR 
This course is a study of selected topics in music.

MUS 2041 CLASS PIANO I 
This course offers group instruction in fundamentals of the keyboard through basic note reading, rhythm, scales and beginning music reading.  (Fall)

MUS 2051 CLASS PIANO II 
Prerequisite: MUS 2041 Class Piano I
This course offers group instruction in fundamentals of the keyboard with a continuation of music reading and an introduction to traditional piano literature.  (Spring)

MUS 2111-2 PRIVATE INSTRUCTION IN MUSIC 
This course will be specified by each enrollment as to the type of private instruction. Students interested in private music lessons should contact a music instructor for additional information.  (Spring, Fall)

MUS 2151 CHORAL UNION 
This course is a singing organization which offers the study and performance of standard compositions from the classical and popular repertory and is open to all college students. It requires three hours of rehearsal a week. It may be repeated for credit.  (Spring, Fall)

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NATURAL SCIENCE

NASC 0123 NATURAL SCIENCE CONCEPTS 
This is a course designed to meet prerequisites to science courses for those students lacking two units of lab science in high school or acceptable ACT scores. 2 semester credit hours lecture; 1 semester credit hour lab. 

NASC 1013-EXPERIENTIAL APPLIED SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of one (1) year of research and instruction at BlueSTEM AgriLearning Center and USDA Grazinglands Research Laboratory
This course is designed for students to apply USDA scientific protocols to research conducted at USDA Grazinglands Research Laboratory under the supervision of BlueSTEM AgriLearning Center Staff.  Students will be expected to work under the direction of USDA scientists, BlueSTEM educators, and designated education facilitators and instructors.  Requirements of this course include research logs, completion of interim assignments related to the research, oral and written communication, ability to follow government research protocols, and presentations at local, regional, state, or national junior science symposium(s).  (Fall, Spring)

NASC 1023 ADVANCED EXPERIENTIAL APPLIED SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH
Prerequisite:  NASC 1013-Experiential Applied Scientific Research
This course is designed for students to continue the application of USDA scientific protocols to research conducted at USDA Grazinglands Research Laboratory under the supervision of BlueSTEM AgriLearning Center Staff.  Students will be expected to work under the direction of USDA scientists, BlueSTEM educators, and designated education facilitators and instructors.  Requirements of this course include research logs, completion of interim assignments related to the research, oral and written communication, ability to follow government research protocols, and presentations at local, regional, state, or national junior science symposium(s).  (Spring, Fall)

NASC 2001-3 NATURAL SCIENCE SEMINAR 
This course is an introduction to many of the various courses offered in science. Areas include biology, zoology, botany, chemistry, physics, geology and other related sciences.

NASC 2012 INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED RESEARCH IN SCIENCE
This course will introduce students to applying the scientific method to basic science research. The research will consist of traditional laboratory work and/or field research. The research will include a variety of scientific disciplines that span both the physical and life sciences.  The course will require students to identify a research question, develop a hypothesis, plan and execute experiments, collect and analyze data and develop conclusions. The student will organize the scientific research into a formal oral presentation and/or poster presentation.  (Fall, Spring)

NASC 2014 METHODOLOGY OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN NATURAL SCIENCES
This course is designed as an interdisciplinary approach to scientific research. Each student will be responsible for individual research projects which include the research, experimental plan and design and collection and analysis of field data. A required scientific report will utilize the scientific method offering experience of cross-curricula dimensions including statistical evaluation of research data. Areas of emphasis will include hydrology, agriculture, biology, chemistry, microbiology and technology. (Fall, Spring)

NASC 2214 METHODS OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND WRITING
This course is designed for the students to apply and complete the scientific method to their research from the previous semesters. The requirements complete the steps of scientific research by teaching the student communication through writing. The course is designed as a “mock publication” to be completed with an oral presentation. Enrollment is contingent on permission of instructor. (Fall) 

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NURSING

NURS 2103 ROLE TRANSITION 
Prerequisite: Acceptable score on the standardized entrance exam and admission to program.
This 3 credit hour course is designed to facilitate the transition into the Associate Degree Program for the LPN, EMT or those with experience in the health care field. The course will focus on the nursing process, skills review, exam success and critical thinking. These areas are vital for successful completion of the nursing program. This course is designed to allow students to demonstrate proficiency in the attainment of course objectives and outcomes found in the course entered (NURS 1224, NURS 1234 or NURS 2131)

NURS 1115 FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING
Prerequisites: Acceptance into the program, CHEM 1215 Chemistry I w/lab or CHEM 1315 General Chemistry w/lab
Prerequisites/Co-requisites: ZOOL 2134 Anatomy w/lab, ENGL 1113 English Composition I and PSY 1113 Elements of Psychology
Co-requisite: NURS 1121 Fundamentals of Nursing Clinical
Fundamentals of Nursing is a 16 week theory and lab experience that introduces the nursing students to the dynamic concepts of person, health, environment and nursing. In addition, the nursing student is introduced to the scientific foundations of nursing practice through the core competencies of the Associate Degree Nurse. The students are introduced to clinical decision making tools (assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation & critical thinking skills), professional behaviors, communication and collaboration within a variety of health care setting and between health care team members. Other core competencies of the Associate Degree Nurse utilized in this course include caring interventions, teaching and learning and management of care. The nursing laboratory provides the nursing students the opportunity to practice nursing skills in a controlled environment. At all times, the student will be expected to be accountable for his/her own actions/behavior.  (Fall)

NURS 1121 FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING CLINICAL
Prerequisites: Acceptance into the program, CHEM 1215 Chemistry I w/lab or CHEM 1315 General Chemistry w/lab
Prerequisites/Co-requisites: ZOOL 2134 Anatomy w/lab, ENGL 1113 English Composition I and PSY 1113 Elements of Psychology
Co-requisite: NURS 1115 Fundamentals of Nursing
Fundamentals of Nursing is a 16 week lab and clinical experience that allows students to utilize new knowledge and apply new skills in the clinical setting. Concepts introduced in nursing theory and lab is utilized to assist the student nurse in planning care for clients in health care settings. Students begin to utilize clinical decision making tools and develop and exhibit professional behaviors in the clinical setting through their contacts with clients and health care personnel. Other core competencies of the Associate Degree Nurse utilized in this course include assessment, communication, caring interventions, teaching and learning, collaboration and management of care. The student will be expected to be accountable and responsible for his/her own actions and practice with in the legal/ethical standards of the nursing profession.  (Fall)

NURS 1211 ADULT HEALTH PROBLEMS CLINICAL
Prerequisite: NURS 1115 Fundamentals of Nursing
Prerequisites/Co-requisites: ZOOL 2144 Physiology w/lab, ENGL 1213 English Composition II and PSY 2163 Developmental Psychology
Co-requisite: NURS 1223 Adult Health Problems
Adult Health Problems Clinical is an 8 week clinical experience expanding previous clinical knowledge and skills of the student in caring for clients with common health problems in the medical – surgical setting. In the clinical environment, the student will continue to utilize clinical decision making tools (assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation & critical thinking) with increasing skill. The clinical setting provides the nursing students the opportunity to plan and provide care for clients, utilizing additional skills learned in the classroom and nursing laboratory and through simulation. Other core competencies of the Associate Degree Nurse utilized in this course include professional behaviors, communication, caring interventions, teaching and learning, collaboration and management of care. The student will be expected to be accountable and responsible for his/her own actions and practice with in the legal/ethical standards of the nursing profession.  (Spring)

NURS 1223 ADULT HEALTH PROBLEMS
Prerequisite: NURS 1115 Fundamentals of Nursing
Prerequisites/Co-requisites: ZOOL 2144 Physiology w/lab, ENGL 1213 English Composition II and PSY 2163 Developmental Psychology
Co-requisite: NURS 1211 Adult Health Problems Clinical
Adult Health Problems is an 8 week theory and lab course experience expanding on the previous knowledge and skills of the student in caring for clients with common health problems in the medical – surgical setting. The student continues to utilize clinical decision making tools (assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation & critical thinking) with increasing skill. Other core competencies of the Associate Degree Nurse utilized in this course include professional behaviors, communication, caring interventions, teaching and learning, collaboration and management of care. The student will utilize simulation technology in application to patient care scenarios. The nursing laboratory provides the nursing students the opportunity to practice additional nursing skills in a controlled environment. At all times, the student will be expected to be accountable for his/her own actions/behavior.  (Spring)

NURS 1233 PARENT-CHILD NURSING
Prerequisites: NURS 1223 Adult Health Problems
Prerequisites/Co-requisites: ZOOL 2144 Physiology w/Lab, ENGL 1213 English Composition II and PSY 2163 Developmental Psychology
Co-requisite: NURS 1233 Parental-Child Nursing Clinical
Parent-Child Nursing is an 8 week theory and lab course experience that introduces the student to care of the maternity client from conception through the puerperium. The process of human reproduction is reviewed and diseases of the male and female reproductive tract are introduced. This course also stresses child health as well as disease processes affecting children from birth to adolescence. The student continues to utilize clinical decision making tools (assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation & critical thinking) with increasing skill. Other core competencies of the Associate Degree Nurse utilized in this course include professional behaviors, communication, caring interventions, teaching and learning, collaboration and management of care. The student will utilize simulation technology in application to patient care scenarios. The nursing laboratory provides the nursing students the opportunity to practice additional nursing skills in a controlled environment. At all times, the student will be expected to be accountable for his/her own actions/behavior.  (Spring)

NURS 1241 PARENT-CHILD NURSING CLINICAL
Prerequisites: NURS 1223 Adult Health Problems
Prerequisites/Co-requisites: ZOOL 2144 Physiology w/Lab, ENGL 1213 English Composition II and PSY 2163 Developmental Psychology
Co-requisite: NURS 1233 Parental-Child Nursing 
Parent-Child Nursing Clinical is an 8 week clinical experience that introduces the nursing student to care of the maternity client during labor, delivery and postpartum period. This clinical experience also introduces the nursing student to the care of the newborn, ill or injured child from birth to adolescence. In the clinical environment, the student will continue to utilize clinical decision making tools (assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation & critical thinking) with increasing skill in order to plan and provide care for a specific group of clients in multiple clinical setting. Other core competencies of the Associate Degree Nurse utilized in this course include professional behaviors, communication, caring interventions, teaching and learning, collaboration and management of care. The student will be expected to be accountable and responsible for his/her own actions and practice with in the legal/ethical standards of the nursing profession.  (Spring)

NURS 2137 COMPLEX ADULT HEALTH W/LAB
Prerequisite: NURS 1233 Parent-Child Nursing
Prerequisites/Co-requisites: MICR 2134 Microbiology with Lab, SOC 1113 Introduction to Sociology and PSY 1113 Elements of Psychology
Co-requisite: NURS 2131 Complex Adult Health Clinical Complex Adult Health is a 16 week theory and lab experience expanding on previous skills and knowledge of the student when caring for the client with complex adult health problems. The student will utilize clinical decision making, (Assessment, Analysis, Planning, Implementation and Evaluation) and work as a healthcare team member. The core competencies of the Associate Degree Nurse will be utilized throughout theory, which include professional behaviors, communication, caring interventions, teaching and learning, collaboration and management of care. The student will be expected to be accountable and responsible for his/her own actions.  (Fall)

NURS 2131 COMPLEX ADULT HEALTH CLINICAL
Prerequisite: NURS 2138 Complex Adult Health
Prerequisite/Co-requisite: HIST 1483 United States History to 1877 or HIST 1493 United States History, 1877 to Present
Complex Adult Health Clinical is a 12 week clinical experience expanding on previous skills and knowledge of the student when caring for the client with complex adult health problems. The student will experience client care in the home health or hospice and hospital setting. Student will utilize clinical decision making (Assessment, Analysis, Planning, Implementation and Evaluation) and work as a healthcare team member. The core competencies of the Associate Degree Nurse will be utilized throughout the clinical experience, which include professional behaviors, communication, assessment, clinical decision making, caring interventions, teaching and learning, collaboration and management of care. The student will be expected to be accountable and responsible for his/her own actions and practice within the legal/ethical standards of the nursing profession.  (Fall)

NURS 2241 CARE OF THE PSYCHIATRIC PATIENT CLINICAL
Prerequisite: NURS 2137 Complex Adult Health
Prerequisite/Co-requisite: HIST 1483 United States History to 1877 or HIST 1493 United States History, 1877 to Present
Co-requisite: NURS 2243 Care of the Psychiatric Patient
Care of the Psychiatric Patient is an 8 week clinical course focusing on the mental health needs of the patient. Advanced communication skills, clinical decision making (Assessment, Analysis, Planning, Interventions and Evaluation) will be used by the student when caring for the patient, families of patients and when participating as part of the health care team. The core competencies of the Associate Degree Nurse will be utilized throughout the clinical experience, which include professional behaviors, communication, assessment, caring interventions, teaching and learning, collaboration and management of care. Students will be expected to demonstrate accountability and responsibility for his/her own actions and will be expected to practice within the legal/ethical parameters of the nursing profession.  (Spring)

NURS 2243 CARE OF THE PSYCHIATRIC PATIENT W/LAB
Prerequisite: NURS 2137 Complex Adult Health
Prerequisite/Co-requisite: HIST 1483 United States History to 1877 or HIST 1493 United States History, 1877 to Present
Co-requisite: NURS 2241 Care of the Psychiatric Patient Clinical
Care of the Psychiatric Patient is an 8 week theory course focusing on the mental health needs of the patient. Advanced communication skills, clinical decision making (Assessment, Analysis, Planning, Interventions and Evaluation) will be used by the student when caring for the patient, families of patients and when participating as part of the health care team. The core competencies of the Associate Degree Nurse will be utilized throughout theory, which include professional behaviors, communication, assessment, caring interventions, teaching and learning, collaboration and management of care. Students will be expected to demonstrate accountability and responsibility for his/her own actions.  (Spring)

NURS 2255 LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT IN NURSING W/LAB
Prerequisite: NURS 2244 Community-Based Nursing Prerequisite/Co-requisite: HIST 1483 United States History to 1877 or HIST 1493 United States History, 1877 to Present
Co-requisite: NURS 2261 Management and Coordination of Nursing Clinical 
Leadership and Management is an 8 week course focusing the management and leadership skills necessary to function as a team member, team leader and member of the nursing profession. Advanced communication skills, clinical decision making (Assessment, Analysis, Planning, Interventions and Evaluation) will be used by the student when caring for the patient, families of patients and when participating as part of the health care team. The core competencies of the Associate Degree Nurse will be utilized throughout the clinical experience, which include professional behaviors, caring interventions, teaching and learning, collaboration and management of care. The student will learn how to function as a team leader, collaborate with other disciplines, develop time management skills and care for multiple clients. This course will also ready the student for the licensure exam. Student will be expected to demonstrate accountability and responsibility for his/her own actions.  (Spring)

NURS 2261 LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT IN NURSING CLINICAL
Prerequisite: NURS 2243 Care of the Psychiatric Patient
Prerequisite/Co-requisite: HIST 1483 United States History to 1877 or HIST 1493 United States History,1877 to Present
Co-requisite: NURS 2255 Management and Coordination of Nursing
Management and Coordination of Nursing Clinical is an 8-week course designed to facilitate the transition from nursing student to graduate nurse. The core competencies of the Associate Degree Nurse will be utilized throughout the clinical experience, which include professional behaviors, communication, assessment, clinical decision making, caring interventions, teaching and learning, collaboration and management of care. The student will function as a team leader, collaborate with other disciplines, develop time management skills and care for multiple clients. Student will be expected to demonstrate accountability and responsibility for his/her own actions and will be expected to practice within the legal/ethical parameters of the nursing profession.  (Spring)

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PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 1113 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 
This course is a study of the human race and the universe through an emphasis on selections from some of the representative philosophers of the past and present.  (Fall)

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

PHSC 1114 PHYSICAL SCIENCE WITH LAB
This is a lecture-demonstration with laboratory course. This course presents concepts from the areas of astronomy, chemistry, physics and earth sciences. 3 hours lecture credit, 1 hour lab credit.

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PHYSICS

PHYS 1115 PHYSICS I WITH LAB
Prerequisites: Math 1513 College Algebra or required score on placement exam
This is a study of mechanics, relativity, heat, thermodynamics and harmonic motion. Hands-on approaches are used in the laboratory to reinforce the material covered in lecture portion of the class. 4 hours lecture credit, 1 hour lab credit.  (Fall)

PHYS 1215 PHYSICS II WITH LAB
Prerequisites: PHYS 1115 Physics with Lab
This is a more detailed look into the experimental side of physics. The course includes an in-depth study of electricity, magnetism, light and modern physics. Experiments will emphasize electrical and magnetic phenomena, optical properties and certain modern physics phenomena. The lab requires a lab notebook be kept and a project be performed at the end of the semester. 3 hours lecture credit, 2 hour lab credit.  (Spring)

PHYS 2515 ENGINEERING PHYSICS I WITH LAB
Pre-requisite/Corequisite:  MATH 2714 Calculus I
This course is a calculus based hands-on approach to mechanics, kinematics, force, energy, relativity, heat, thermodynamics, and harmonic motion.  Projects will include robotics, radio spectrometry and Python programming.  4 hours lecture credit; 1 hour lab credit 

PHYS 2525 ENGINEERING PHYSICS II WITH LAB
Pre-requisite/Corequisite Recommended MATH 2734 Calculus II and MATH 2754 Calculus III OR Permission of Instructor
This course is a more detailed calculus based hands-on approach to waves, electromagnetism, optics, relativity, and quantum physics.  Projects will include circuit building, robotics, radio spectrometry and Python programming.   3 hours lecture credit; 2 hour lab credit 

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POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 1113 UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 
This course focuses on the origin and operation of the national government with emphasis on the American Constitutional System. It is designed to help students become better citizens. It is required with any degree.  (Spring, Fall)

POLS 2001-3 POLITICAL SCIENCE SEMINAR 
This course presents studies in selected topics in political science.

POLS 2143 INTRODUCTION TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT 
This course looks at the place of the state in American federalism and studies the government of municipalities and counties.  (Spring)

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PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 1113 ELEMENTS OF PSYCHOLOGY 
This course is an introduction to the basic principles of human development, learning adjustment and maladjustment, personality, intelligence, group processes and perception.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

PSY 2001-3 PSYCHOLOGY SEMINAR 
This course presents studies in selected topics in psychology.  (Spring, Fall)

PSY 2011 COLLEGE TRANSFER PREP 
This course is intended for students who want to learn more about the process of transferring from Redlands Community College to another higher education institution after graduation.  This course is designed to meet the needs of students in the Student Support Services Grant program.

PSY 2033 ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY 
Prerequisite: PSY 1113 Elements of Psychology 
This course covers the physical, mental, social and emotional development of youth, with attention given to observation of the adolescent.  (Spring)

PSY 2043 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 
Prerequisite: PSY 1113 Elements of Psychology
This course investigates group dynamics, including the properties of the group and group structure and the products of interactions, attitudes, prejudices and values.  (Spring)

PSY 2163 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 
This course is designed to provide insight regarding the developmental process from conception to death. Special attention is given to the physical, cognitive and psychosocial domains of each life stage.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

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SOCIOLOGY

SOC 1113 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 
This is a general survey of the fundamental concepts of sociology, the elements and processes of social interactions and the application of sociological principles to social institutions, groups and problems.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

SOC 1121-3 INTRODUCTION TO SERVICE LEARNING
Prerequisite: ENGL1113 English Composition I
By combining academic theory with practical real-life experience, service-learning provides students with a broader and deeper understanding of themselves and their place in the community and fosters the students’ sense of civic engagement. This course provides academic-based, community service projects and adheres to the principles of Campus Compact. Credit hours earned will depend upon the amount of time the student plans to invest each week in the service project.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

SOC 2001-3 BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE SEMINAR 
This course presents selected studies in sociology.

SOC 2133 CRIME AND DELINQUENCY 
Prerequisite: SOC 1113 Introduction to Sociology 
This course is a survey of the nature and extent of crime in selected areas of the nation. It includes identification of the contributing causes of the crime for each area; designation of the particular approaches to apprehension and identification of the socially acceptable means of treatment.  (Spring)

SOC 2173 PROBLEMS IN SOCIOLOGY 
This course focuses primary attention on current social problems. Topics include mental illness, drugs, minority group relations, crime, delinquency and general social disorganization.  (Fall)

SOC 2183 SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY 
This course centers on the normative development of the family unit in contemporary life. The course includes attention to current research regarding changes in the family, alternative lifestyles, extended families, relationship development, life cycle transitions, divorce and remarriage.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

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SPANISH

SPA 1053 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I 
This course covers speaking and responding in basic Spanish phrases and sentences. It also introduces very basic concepts of Spanish grammar and the reading and writing of simple sentences in Spanish. This course is not intended to fulfill foreign language degree requirements.  (Fall)

SPA 1063 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II 
Prerequisite: SPA 1053 Conversational Spanish I or approval of the instructor.
This course is designed to elaborate and embellish upon basic conversational skills introduced in Conversational Spanish I. Practical oral and written communication in Spanish will be emphasized. This course is not intended to fulfill foreign language degree requirements.  (Spring)

SPA 1115 BEGINNING SPANISH I 
This is an elementary course in Spanish grammar, pronunciation, reading and conversation. The student will be able to communicate better in a global society.  (Fall)

SPA 1125 BEGINNING SPANISH II 
Prerequisite: SPA 1115 Beginning Spanish I 
This course is a continuation of SPA 1115 Beginning Spanish I, an elementary course in understanding, speaking, reading and writing Spanish. The student will be able to communicate in a global society with the knowledge of the Spanish language.  (Spring)

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SPEECH

SPCH 1113 FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH 
This is a basic course in which principles of speech communication as they apply to interpersonal relationships, group discussions and individual speech presentations are emphasized. The practical application of effective speech skills and their importance to success in college, career and social relationships receive careful consideration.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

SPCH 2001-3 SPEECH SEMINAR 
This course is a study of selected topics in speech.

SPCH 2133 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION 
This is a course in which skills in effective communications with friends, family and co-workers are developed through the application of theoretical communication principles to everyday situations. Use of role playing, interviewing and group discussion activities allows the application of acquired knowledge about self-concept, listening, body language, assertiveness and conflict management to their relationships with individuals and small groups.  (Spring, Fall)

SPCH 2313 BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL SPEECH 
This course is designed to assist in applying speaking skills for typical life situations. Development of skills in preparing and presenting informative, persuasive and special occasion speeches is emphasized. Opportunities for practice in job interviews, chairing meetings and presenting business or professional reports will also be provided.

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VITICULTURE

VIN 1113 INTRODUCTION TO VITICULTURE
This course is designed to introduce students to current practices for establishing a commercial vineyard and maintaining its health and productivity once established. Topics covered include varietal selection, site preparation, equipment, site selection, first season establishment, vine growth development and training, trellis systems, vine propagation, weed control and vine disease control. Field practicum sessions consisting of 16 hours of hands-on experience will be scheduled in area vineyards. (Spring, Fall)

VIN 2101-2104 VITICULTURE PRACTICUM
The Vineyard Practicum is designed to give students the opportunity to work in an established vineyard and interact with a qualified mentor. (Spring, Fall)

VIN 2112 INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT
Effective grape production depends on the grower developing a system of grape management that is appropriate for each vineyard. Decisions need to be made for how to manage all of the normal cultural practices such as planting, fertility, harvesting, and pruning as well as managing the insect, disease, and weed problems that occur either regularly or sporadically. The information in this course will address management issues related to common, expected pest problems as well as the occasional appearance of minor pest problems.

VIN 2122 WINTER VITICULTURE TECHNOLOGY 
Prerequisites: VIN 1113 Introduction to Viticulture 
This course is designed to provide students initiated in the field of viticulture practical experience in winter vineyard operations.  Students are required to partner with an approved vineyard to participate in the required field experience portion of the course which will serve as work experience for those seeking employment in commercial viticulture. (Spring)

VIN 2142 SPRING VITICULTURE TECHNOLOGY
Prerequisite: VIN 1113 Introduction to Viticulture
This course is designed to provide students initiated in the field of viticulture practical experience in spring vineyard operations. Students are required to partner with an approved vineyard to participate in the required field experience portion of the course which will serve as work experience for those seeking employment in commercial viticulture. (Spring)

VIN 2702 MARKETING FOR THE SMALL WINERY
This course explores the marketing strategies for small wineries. During the course, students will build a basic understanding of different aspects of marketing such as label design and packaging, tasting room promotion, and general marketing principles. It will also introduce various marketing channels including, social media, e-mail, word-of-mouth, and winery web sites. (Fall)

VIN 2722 WINERY TASTING ROOM MANAGEMENT
This course will explore all aspects of managing a winery tasting room.  It will cover topics such as tasting room “look and feel,” merchandizing, customer service, customer relationships, sales opportunities, sensory evaluation, staff training and the importance of leadership.  The focus will be on customer service and customer loyalty. (Spring)

VIN 2763 ADVANCED TASTING ROOM MANAGEMENT
Prerequisites:  VIN 2722 Winery Tasting Room Management or permission through VESTA 
This course explores the key components needed to optimize sales and profitability for tasting room management.  The class will focus on direct sales and tasting room activities, wine club management, direct shipping, inventory control, promotions and merchandising, customer relationship management, winery events management, employee compensation issues and employee training.   (Spring, Fall)    

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WILDLIFE SCIENCE

WILD 1513 INTRODUCTION TO WILDLIFE CONSERVATION 
This course is a survey of the many aspects of wildlife conservation. Principles of conservation and management, ecology, mathematical modeling, law enforcement and inter-governmental agencies relationships are emphasized. 

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ZOOLOGY

ZOOL 1125 ZOOLOGY WITH LAB
Prerequisites: none
This course is a study of the animal kingdom with emphasis on phylogenetic relationships, comparative anatomy, physiology, morphology, behavior and ecological relationships of all animal behavior. Evolution of systems and mechanisms which have allowed animals to survive and adapt to diverse habitats will also be studied. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab credit.  (Spring)

ZOOL 2134 ANATOMY WITH LAB
Prerequisites: none
This course covers cytology, histology, development and gross morphology of all human body systems. A look at a few diseases will also be addressed in the appropriate body system to compare the normal conditions with the abnormal characteristics that develop in both lecture and laboratory. 3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab credit.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

ZOOL 2144 PHYSIOLOGY WITH LAB
Prerequisite:  Introductory General Chemistry course, ZOOL 2134 Human Anatomy or permission of instructor
This course involves the study of the functional systems of the human body. Included are the special senses, circulatory, digestive, endocrine, nervous, muscular, respiratory, skeletal, integumentary, urinary and reproductive systems.
3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab credit.  (Spring, Summer, Fall)

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